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Workshops - Sunday April 30

Training workshops are not included with conference registration. All training workshops require advanced registration and in most cases, payment of a separate registration fee to attend. Walk-ins will not be allowed to participate without first registering and paying registration fee (if applicable).

$ - Indicates a fee-based workshop
* Targeted toward State Floodplain Managers & Hazard Mitigation Officers are

Floodplain Management 101 (9am - 5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
SUNDAY, 4/30/2017 from 9am-5pm
Cost = $80, 6.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
Floodplain Management 101 covers the basic tenets of the NFIP and the minimum administrative requirements to successfully implement a community floodplain management program. Participants will learn the fundamentals of individual and local responsibilities for managing flood risks and loss through proper permitting and planning.

PRE-REQUISITES
None

TARGET AUDIENCE
New floodplain managers with less than two years of experience.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Define basic abbreviations and terms.
  2. Identify legislative events in the NFIP’s history & recall the three goals of the NFIP
  3. List the federal, state and local roles in the NFIP
  4. Describe (in general terms) the minimum standards of the NFIP
  5. Identify what information can be found in a Flood Insurance Study, and determine the BFE with a flood map and FIS for a specific property
  6. Define an Approximate A Zone, and review how to find BFEs in Approximate A Zones
  7. Explain Letters of Map Change
  8. List the everyday duties of a local floodplain administrator and define a violation
  9. Explain why substantial damage/improvement is a key tool in floodplain management and identify major considerations when making a substantial damage/improvement determination
  10. Recognize when permits are, and are not, required for activities in the floodplain
  11. Describe how to use an Elevation Certificate in floodplain management
  12. Review how to handle variance requests, and discuss the process for remedying violations
  13. Identify actions FEMA may take for community non-compliance with the NFIP
TOPICS
  • NFIP Basics
  • Maps & Flood Insurance Studies (FIS)
    • Using the Maps
    • Approximate Zone A
    • Updating the Map
  • The Floodplain Administrator’s Role
  • NFIP Compliance
    • Permits
    • Elevation Certificates
    • Variances
    • Violations
    • Actions for Non-Compliance
OUTLINE
40% Lecture
30% Facilitated Discussion
30% Small Group Exercise

AGENDA
1.25 hour Unit 1: NFIP Basics
2.00 hour Unit 2: Maps & FIS
1.25 hour Unit 3: The Floodplain Administrator’s Role
1.50 hour Unit 4: NFIP Compliance
0.25 hour Q&A

EXERCISES
  • Students exercises will include learning to map a property on a Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) and how to determine the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) using the FIRM and the Flood Insurance Study (FIS) to within one tenth of a foot.  
  • Students will be given scenarios for which they must determine if Substantial Damage or Substantial Improvement applies, and or which information is missing necessary to make the determination.  
  • Students will be given various scenarios where they must determine if a permit is required.  
  • Students will also be asked to identify information necessary to complete the FEMA Elevation Certificate (EC), using photos of various buildings determining which diagram applies, and commonly made mistakes and errors on the EC.
  • Students will be given various examples where they must decide whether or not to grant a variance.
Instructors:
Shanna Michael, GISP, CFM
GIS Specialist III, AECOM
Shanna Michael has over 10 years of experience working with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), Hazard Mitigation Planning, community planning, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Hazus, and risk assessments. She has a Bachelor of Science from the University of Missouri in Kansas City in Environmental Science, as well as a GIS Certificate. She is currently a Hazus trained professional and Hazus trainer, and is the current president for the Heartland Hazus User Group. She has experience with FEMA’s Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map production and processes.

Jennifer Marcy, CFM
Project Manager, Atkins North America, Inc.
Jen has been providing flood- and NFIP-related outreach, training, and expertise on floodplain management regulations for over 12 years. She has trained hundreds of state and local floodplain managers across the country using a Certified Floodplain Manager Training program she created. Jen has been a co-chair for ASFPM's Training and Outreach Committee since 2009, and is on the Board of Directors of her own State Association (NY).

Heidi Carlin, CFM
Sr. Strategic Communications Specialist, AECOM
Heidi M. Carlin currently works as a Sr. Strategic Communications Specialist for AECOM. She is the Training Coordinator for the RAMPP team, supporting Risk MAP efforts for Regions II, III, and VI. She is also invovled with coastal outreach efforts, has developed training for EMI, assists with the National Dam Safety Awareness Program, and provides NFIP Technical Support to FEMA HQ. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in Geography from Texas State – San Marcos. Her previous experience includes work educating floodplain managers, real estate agents, developers, and others in the river basin and continues to provide technical assistance to professionals and the general public.

* Building Codes & Standards: Recent Changes & FEMA Policies (1pm - 3pm) - $

Intermediate = written for attendees with some experience in FPM or the topic area
SUNDAY, 4/30/2017 from 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs


DESCRIPTION
For many years FEMA has considered building codes a cornerstone of effective mitigation and the agency's strategic plans have included support for development and adoption of rigorous, risk-informed building codes and standards. This workshop will identify recently adopted significant changes in the I-Codes and ASCE 24 and changes coming in the 2018 edition of the I-Codes. We will explain how reliance on codes and standards is incorporated into FEMA policies and programs: Community Rating System; Hazard Mitigation grants (retrofit, reconstruction projects, elevation, code adoption, post-disaster enforcement); NFIP Floodproofing Certificate; and Public Assistance (for repair of damaged public buildings and facilities).

PREREQUISITES
Attendees are encouraged to review the excerpts of the flood provisions of the 2015 International Codes, lists of changes from previous editions (2012 and 2009), and “Highlights of ASCE 24” (2014 and 2005), available online: https://www.fema.gov/building-code-resources. In addition, attendees may wish to review the Floodproofing Certificate (https://www.fema.gov/floodproofing-certificate ) and Section E.1.1 of FEMA’s HMA Unified Guidance (https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/103279 ).

TARGET AUDIENCE
Floodplain managers, federal/state/local officials, design professionals

OBJECTIVES
  1. Identify and explain recent significant changes to the International Codes and ASCE 24 Flood Resistant Design and Construction
  2. Understand the authority under which FEMA acts to incorporate codes and standards into agency policies
  3. Recognize inclusion of codes and standards in FEMA policies and programs apply in all States and communities, regards of whether codes are already adopted
  4. Know where to find FEMA resources for the flood provisions in the I-Codes and ASCE 24
TOPICS
  • Changes in flood provisions of the 2015 I-Codes (freeboard, Coastal A Zone, openings in breakaway walls, tanks)
  • Changes in ASCE 24-2014 (500-yr for critical facilities, dry floodproofing and mixed use, performance of flood openings, multi-story parking garages)
  • Upcoming changes in the 2018 I-Codes (concrete slabs and stairways in Zone V)
  • Existing FEMA policies and programs that incorporate codes and standards and recent changes (FEMA Recovery Policy FP-104-009-4: Public Assistance Required Minimum Standards and FEMA Policy 204-078-2: Disaster Risk Reduction Minimum Codes and Standards)
  • Coordinated Floodplain Management Ordinance with model building code requirements
OUTLINE
50% Lecture
40% Facilitated discussion
10% Exercise

AGENDA
10 min. Introductions
05 min. FEMA support for building codes
20 min. Recent changes in 2015 I-Codes  
15 min. Recent changes in ASCE 24-15
05 min. Upcoming changes in 2018 I-Codes
30 min. Recent changes to FEMA programs and policies
20 min. FEMA Building Code Resources  
15 min. Wrap up

EXERCISES
  • Attendees will be given excerpts of I-Codes and ASCE 24 text, and asked to identify the differences between 2012/24-05 and 2015/24-14 – and write 2 or 3 sentences explaining why the change is justified and which should get credited by the CRS as a “higher standard.”
  • Attendees will be given excerpts of the NFIP regulations and the updated Floodproofing Certificate, and asked to identify the differences between CFR requirements for certification of floodproofing and the Floodproofing Certificate – and write a brief justification for the differences.
Instructors:
John Ingargiola, EI, CBO, CFM
Senior Engineer, FEMA Building Science Branch
John Ingargiola is a Sr. Engineer in the Building Sciences Branch of the Risk Management Directorate at FEMA’s Federal Insurance & Mitigation Administration in Washington, DC. John’s work involves a broad range of mitigation activities including: pre and post-disaster building sciences, education, working with model building code and standards-producing organizations, development of technical guidance document, and coordination with various partners. He has managed FEMA’s post-disaster Mitigation Assessment Team Building Performance studies conducted for Hurricanes Charley, Ivan, Katrina and Sandy. Before coming to FEMA in 1999, John served as a Building Code Official in Florida. Mr. Ingargiola holds a Bachelor of Engineering Degree in Civil Engineering from the Cooper Union for Advancement of Science and Art.

Rebecca Quinn, CFM
President, RCQuinn Consulting
Rebecca Quinn, CFM, president of RCQuinn Consulting, Inc. and a consultant to the FEMA Building Science Branch and a number of states, specializes in floodplain management and mitigation, with particular focus on the National Flood Insurance Program and the International Codes. For 10 years she was Maryland's NFIP State Coordinator and the State Hazard Mitigation Officer. Since 1998, she has been a consultant to FEMA on matters related to building codes and publications. In addition, she has worked with local jurisdictions, state agencies, and other clients involved in preparing building code coordinated model floodplain management ordinances, producing guidance documents, evaluating programs, and implementing mitigation projects.

Getting Familiar with the USGS Flood-data Toolbox (1pm - 5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
SUNDAY, 4/30/2017 from 1-5pm
Cost = $45, 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
The US Geological Survey is uniquely situated closest to streams on the landscape collecting critical observations that so many communities depend on for model calibration, and decision support. Join us to learn how to efficiently connect to our data and maybe about some new data processing techniques!

PREREQUISITES
Basic knowledge of streamgages and flood mechanics.

WHAT TO BRING
We recommend attendees bring a laptop computer with ability to access the internet, and a USB port or Internet connection to get the most out of the exercises.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Anyone that needs USGS data, so everyone!

OBJECTIVES
  1. Access and connect to a variety of USGS data tools including streamgages, flood data, lidar data, NHD and WBD. Be able to format their local HWM data for loading into the USGS database and know the next steps to take with their local USGS office to get the data reviewed and approved
  2. Be able to understand the difference in several flood inundated area mapping methods and when to apply the different methods.
  3. Know what to do and who to contact if you need help accessing any of these data during an event or anytime.
TOPICS
  • How to access flood data, including:
    • Real-time streamgages and rapid-deployment streamgages
    • USGS peak-flow data
    • Event-based data collection like High-Water marks
    • StreamStats and flood-frequency data
  • Flood Inundation Mapping Overview, including:
    • Map Libraries
    • Remotely Sensed Inundated Areas
    • Flood Documentation Mapping Methods
    • GIS-based Mapping Methods
  • Lidar Access and Contracting
  • How to Access Geospatial Data, including:
    • National Hydrography Dataset and Tools
    • National Watershed Boundary Dataset and Tools

OUTLINE
50% lecture
20% facilitated discussion
30% exercises

AGENDA
10 min. Introductions and logistics
10 min. USGS Water Program overview
40 min. How to Access Flood Data Participating in the Furnished High-Water Mark database
60 min. Lidar data and other remote sensing assets
10 min. NHD and tools
30 min. WBD and tools
50 min. Flood Inundation Mapping Overview and Methods
30 min. Water Data listening session

EXERCISES
Students will be provided with sample HWM data or they can bring their own to format into the provided templates. They will then work with the instructors to make sure they know the next steps to contact the local USGS office for submission and processing.

Instructors:
Marie Peppler
Federal Liaison for Surface Water, US Geological Survey
Marie C. Peppler works n the Office of Surface Water as the Federal Agency Liaison and the National USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Coordinator. Marie guides the development, publication and communication of USGS Flood Inundation Mapping projects. As the Federal Agency Liaison, Marie coordinates the activities of the USGS Streamgage Network and other programs with our federal partners, such as the National Weather Service, the US Army Corps of Engineers and the International Joint Commission. She also works on geospatial data coordination and communication for other programs, including the USGS flooding and hurricane responses. Marie started her career with the USGS Wisconsin Water Science Center in 2002 as a fluvial geomorphologist and graduated with a Master’s Degree in Geography in 2006 from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

* Hurricane Awareness (AWR-343) (1pm - 5pm)

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
SUNDAY, 4/30/2017 from 1:00p - 5:00pm
Cost = FREE pre-registration required (course expenses covered by NDPTC), 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
This course provides participants with a basic understanding of the latest knowledge in hurricane science, forecasting, warning and preparedness. The course enhances the ability of participants to identify and describe hazards associated with hurricanes and better prepare for and mitigate the impacts of high winds, heavy rain and storm surge.

PREREQUISITES
None

TARGET AUDIENCE
Emergency Managers, First Responders, Small Businesses, Corporation, Federal/State/Local/Tribal Governments, and Non-Governmental Organizations.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Participants will summarize the structure and characteristics of tropical cyclones and associated hazards.
  2. Participants will explain the hurricane forecasting process and the National Weather Service’s hurricane advisory system.
  3. Participants will demonstrate comprehension of the National Weather Service’s hurricane advisory products.
TOPICS
  • Welcome, Introduction, and Administration
  • Hurricane Structure and Hazards
  • Hurricane Forecasting and Warning
  • Hurricane Advisory Products
  • Evaluation and Conclusion
OUTLINE
10% Group Activity
60% Lecture
30% Facilitated Discussion

AGENDA
50 Min Module 1- Welcome, Introduction and Administration
30 Min Module 2- Hurricane Structure and Hazards
30 Min Module 3- Hurricane Forecasting and Warning
60 Min Module 4- Hurricane Advisory Products
40 Min Module 5- Evaluation and Conclusionstration

EXERCISES
A tropical storm activity is presented and each group is expected to properly read, analyze, and utilize National Hurricane Center advisory products provided to them. The instructor will ask groups specific questions about the advisory products and a lead class discussion. The activity will challenge participants to demonstrate comprehension of hurricane science, forecasting, and warning.

Instructors:
Cheryl Nelson
Instructor, National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC)

Allison Hardin, CFM
Instructor, National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC)
Allison Hardin, CFM is an urban planner and award-winning planning advocate focused on balancing natural resources with economic development by incorporating principles such as No Adverse Impact, triple bottom line planning, and aiming for resiliency, not just sustainability. Currently, Allison works for the City of Myrtle Beach as a city planner. Her 23-year career includes experience with regional and urban planning, GIS mapping and coordination, floodplain management, hazard mitigation planning, business continuity and emergency services. Allison served four years as a co-chair for the ASFPM Coastal Issues committee. In 2012, she was tapped as one of 100 invited to the national stakeholder meeting to set the mitigation framework of PPD-8, and later that year received the Award for Planning Awareness by the SC chapter of the American Planning Association for her work to promote resilient community practices. She is a contract instructor for the University of Hawaii's National Disaster Preparedness Training Center to instruct local government officials and community leaders in Coastal Community Resilience awareness and Coastal Flood Risk Reduction principles and practices. Allison has been part of a team of NGOs working with NOAA on the Digital Coast web portal - ensuring local decision-makers have easy access to the best available data and coastal decision making tools since 2009: http://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast. Most recently, she was part of the Climate Resilience committee steered by RESOLVE to encourage state hazard mitigation plans to address public health impacts due to climate change.

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Workshops - Monday May 1

* Social Media for Disaster Response & Recovery (PER-304) (8am - 5pm)

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017 from 8am-5pm
Cost = FREE, pre-registration is required. (course expenses covered by NDPTC), 6.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
This course enhances participants' abilities to build up an organization's communication strategy for disaster preparedness, response and recovery. The course will provide participants with knowledge and skills of social media and its uses, current tools, methods and models to properly make use of social media for crisis communication. Through the use of social media tools participants will learn and master skills to disseminate information and monitor, track, measure and analyze social media traffic.

PREREQUISITES
None

WHAT TO BRING
Participants will be required to bring their own WiFi capable laptop computers/device that have the capability to access non-secured Internet sites. Participants will need to have web access to their email accounts in order to register for social media tools. (If participants have previously signed up for Twitter or Facebook, they must be able to log in during the class.)

TARGET AUDIENCE
State, Local, Non-Government Organizations, Government/Public decision-makers, emergency managers, response personnel, planners and other professionals (public/private).

OBJECTIVES
  1. Participants will be able to describe the social media ecosystem.
  2. Participants will be able to identify roles and trends for social media use in disaster management.
  3. Participants will be able to integrate social media strategies, policies and procedures into existing communication strategy and policy.
  4. Participants will be able to identify and utilize crowdsourcing for information gathering and sharing.
  5. Participants will be able to use the functions of Facebook and tools for increased customization and analysis.
  6. Participants will be able to use the functions of Twitter and Instagram to communicate and search.
TOPICS
  • Welcome, Administration, and Introduction
  • Introduction to Social Media
  • Understanding the Use of Social Media and Disaster Management
  • Implementing Social Media Platforms in Disaster Management
  • Facebook Hands-On
  • Twitter Hands-On
  • Crowdsourcing and Data Mining
  • Course Summary and Administration
OUTLINE
30% Hands On activity
50% Lecture
20% Facilitated Discussion

 
AGENDA
30 Min. Module 1- Welcome Administrative, and Introduction
60 Min. Module 2- Introduction to Social Media
60 Min. Module 3- Understanding the Use of Social Media and Disaster Management
60 Min. Module 4- Implementing Social Media Platforms in Disaster Management
60 Min. Module 5- Facebook Hands-On
60 Min. Module 6- Twitter Hands-On
45 Min. Module 7- Crowdsourcing and Data Mining
30 Min. Module 8- Course Summary and Administration


EXERCISES

  • An instructor-led discussion to provide an overview of social media and its impact on society. At the end of the module, students will configure their laptops for WiFi access and will conduct some instructor-led web-browsing of social media sites. 
  • An instructor-led discussion on the role of social media for disaster preparedness and management. At the end of the module, students will create social media accounts. 
  • An instructor-led discussion of Facebook concepts, tools and applications. At the end of the module, participants will use Facebook to demonstrate the various tools and applications that can be utilized to broadcast and gather information. Hands on exercises include significant interaction between participants.
  • An instructor-led discussion of Twitter concepts, tools and applications. At the end of the module, participants will use Twitter to demonstrate the various tools and applications that can be utilized to broadcast and gather information. Hands on exercises include significant interaction between participants.
Instructors:
Kevin Sur
Instructor, National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC)
Kevin serves as an Emergency Management Instructor for Ohio Emergency Management Agency, as well as an Instructor for the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC). Previously, he has served as a Program Officer-4 for the Cuyahoga County Office of Emergency Management overseeing all Training/Outreach/Education/Exercises for Public Safety & Justice Services, Deputy Fire Chief at North Randall Fire and Bazetta Fire. Kevin was awarded the Ohio American College of Emergency Physicians' EMS Star of Life Award for his deployment with the Ohio Task Force to Louisiana's Lower 9th ward during Hurricane Katrina/Rita in St. Bernard Parish. Most recently, Kevin served in the Joint Information Center (PIO) and the Emergency Operations Center during Hurricane Sandy. In 2014, Kevin was invited to the White House for the Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Initiative and has been named Cleveland's Top 10 Most Interesting Tweeps on Twitter from WKYC / MetroMix (NBC affiliate). Additionally, he has received numerous awards including Fire Officer of the Year and a Unit Citation award for Excellence in EMS care. Kevin frequent lectures include Engine Company Fire Tactics, Incident Command, DHS/FEMA NIMS ICS All-Hazards Operations/Plans/Logistics Section Chief, IMT Liaison Officer, Firefighter Rescue, Public Information Officer (PIO)/Social Media, and Emergency Services Leadership. Follow him on Twitter: @rusnivek, or on his blog, www.whereisrusnivek.com.

Allison Hardin, CFM
Instructor, National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC)
Allison Hardin, CFM is an urban planner and award-winning planning advocate focused on balancing natural resources with economic development by incorporating principles such as No Adverse Impact, triple bottom line planning, and aiming for resiliency, not just sustainability. Currently, Allison works for the City of Myrtle Beach as a city planner. Her 23-year career includes experience with regional and urban planning, GIS mapping and coordination, floodplain management, hazard mitigation planning, business continuity and emergency services. Allison served four years as a co-chair for the ASFPM Coastal Issues committee. In 2012, she was tapped as one of 100 invited to the national stakeholder meeting to set the mitigation framework of PPD-8, and later that year received the Award for Planning Awareness by the SC chapter of the American Planning Association for her work to promote resilient community practices. She is a contract instructor for the University of Hawaii's National Disaster Preparedness Training Center to instruct local government officials and community leaders in Coastal Community Resilience awareness and Coastal Flood Risk Reduction principles and practices. Allison has been part of a team of NGOs working with NOAA on the Digital Coast web portal - ensuring local decision-makers have easy access to the best available data and coastal decision making tools since 2009: http://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast. Most recently, she was part of the Climate Resilience committee steered by RESOLVE to encourage state hazard mitigation plans to address public health impacts due to climate change.

Floodproofing: Not as Cut & Dry as You Think (8am - 12pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017 from 8am-12pm
Cost = $45, 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
This workshop will provide guidance on floodproofing non-residential buildings in riverine areas and coastal areas not subject to wave action. It focuses primarily on dry floodproofing, but provides an overview of other retrofit methods that can be used in conjunction with or independent of dry floodproofing. The other retrofit methods include wet floodproofing, floodwalls, protection of utilities and emergency floodproofing measures. This is a companion course to FEMA P-936 Floodproofing Non-Residential Structures. Following this workshop attendees will be able to discuss and recommend flood mitigation to their clients for more resilient buildings and address climate change.

PREREQUISITES
Participants are encouraged to read Chapter 1 of FEMA P-936, Floodproofing Non-Residential Structures (https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/34270). In addition, attendees may wish to review the Floodproofing Certificate (https://www.fema.gov/floodproofing-certificate).

TARGET AUDIENCE
Design professionals, floodplain managers

OBJECTIVES
  1. Analyze an area for potential flood risk.
  2. Understand the methods for dry floodproofing for existing non-residential buildings in riverine areas subject to shallow flooding (1 to 3 feet) and in coastal areas not subject to wave action.
  3. Explain to clients other flood retrofit methods in addition to dry floodproofing.
  4. Develop a comprehensive floodproofing plan utilizing appropriate subcontractors.
TOPICS
  • Introduction and Flood Risk: Types of flood damage, NFIP regulations and requirements, NFIP Technical Bulletins, ASCE 24, Determining design flood elevation
  • Floodproofing Concepts and Planning: Overview of flood mitigation measures, Nonresidential flood mitigation, Developing a comprehensive plan, MAT report findings
  • Case Study Exercise
OUTLINE
60% Lecture
20% Facilitated Discussion

20% Small group exercise

 
AGENDA
1 hour   Unit 1 –Introduction and Flood Risk
2 hour   Unit 2–Floodproofing Concepts and Planning
45 min.  Unit 3–Case Study


EXERCISES
The group exercise will consist of the attendees being broken up into teams. One case study will be provided to the entire class. This will consist of some project data and a series of photographs of the area. During the course of about 20 minutes the teams will review the given information and photographs in order to develop a floodproofing plan for the building. This will include a determination of flood risk and development of a comprehensive floodproofing approach in order to address the various building elements shown in the photographs. At the conclusion of the time spent to develop the floodproofing approach the class will be brought back together to discuss each team’s approach. This exercise will allow attendees to not only apply the knowledge they’ve developed during the class, but also interact with others in order to find creative ways to solve the problem presented.

Instructors:
Daniel Bass, R.A., CFM
Architect, FEMA Building Science Branch
Dan Bass works in the Building Science Branch of the Risk Management Directorate at FEMA’s Federal Insurance & Mitigation Administration in Washington, DC. He has been with FEMA since June 2006 and worked extensively on the Gulf Coast in the Hurricane Katrina Recovery efforts as well as numerous other flood and tornado disasters. Dan specializes in Coastal construction, FEMA P-361 safe rooms, mitigation measures for structures, and floodplain management. Dan also oversaw the Hurricane Isaac Mitigation Assessment Team.

Adam Reeder, PE, CFM
Project Manager, CDM Smith
Mr. Reeder is a nationally recognized subject matter expert in flood and wind mitigation. He has been and author on approximately 10 publications for FEMA. He has been the instructor for FEMA's Coastal Construction, the Fundamentals of Building Science, and the Residential Flood Retrofit Classes at the Emergency Management Institute. He was an instructor and developed the course materials for FEMA's Nonresidential Floodproofing Course and their course on ASCE 24. Mr. Reeder has participated in FEMA’s Mitigation Assessment Teams (MAT) for both Hurricanes Isaac and Sandy to evaluate the performance of residential structures. He has been a primary author on several MAT recovery advisories.

* State Floodplain Manager 1 on 1: Participation in the CAP-SSSE (8am - 12pm)

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017  from 8am-12pm

Cost = FREE, pre-registration is required. (course expenses covered by FEMA), 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
State Floodplain Manager 1 on 1, Module 6: Participation in the CAP-SSSE. This workshop is designed for state level floodplain managers and HMA staff. INVITE ONLY: State Floodplain Managers, State Hazard Mitigation Officers and staff, FEMA staff only.

PREREQUISITES
None

TARGET AUDIENCE
INVITE ONLY: State Floodplain Managers, State Hazard Mitigation Officers and staff, FEMA staff only.

Instructor:
Al Goodman, Jr., CFM
Principal, AWG Consulting, LLC

* FEMA Benefit-Cost Analysis and Climate Change: Current Guidance (10am - 12pm) - $

Intermediate = written for attendees with some experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017 from 10am-12pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
In response to FEMA policy statement, 2011-OPPA-01, “FEMA Climate Change Adaptation Policy," FEMA has been developing tools and techniques to incorporate climate change and sea level rise into benefit-cost analysis (BCA) for the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) programs. This interactive workshop provides an understanding of FEMA BCA tools and techniques to incorporate climate change that can help increase the likelihood of documenting project cost-effectiveness for FEMA mitigation grants.

PREREQUISITES
Attendees familiar with the FEMA BCA software and either taken a BCA training course (E-276 at EMI or IS-276 online) or previously reviewed/submitted project BCAs for FEMA hazard mitigation grants will get the most out of this workshop.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Federal, State and local officials responsible for preparing or reviewing FEMA hazard mitigation grants

OBJECTIVES
  1. Discuss the impacts of FEMA’s climate change adaptation policy on the cost-effectiveness of hazard mitigation projects.
  2. Explain how to account for sea level rise in hazard mitigation projects using the FEMA BCA Flood and Damage Frequency Assessment (DFA) modules.
  3. Identify the conditions and requirements for using the FEMA BCA tools for climate resilient mitigation activity (CRMA) projects.
  4. Understand the “dos and don’ts” for analyzing and documenting BCA software inputs related to climate change, event damages and recurrence intervals.
  5. Apply workshop principles using one or two case studies.
TOPICS
  • Ground rules for applying climate change to BCA for FEMA projects.
  • Approaches to account for sea level rise in the FEMA Flood & Damage Frequency Assessment BCA modules.
  • Types of climate resilient mitigation activities available for mitigation grant funding.
  • BCA tools to assess the cost-effectiveness of climate resilient mitigation activities.
  • Key “dos and don’ts” for analyzing and documenting software inputs.
OUTLINE
The workshop will be presented through a combination of lecture and interactive discussion of how to select and input climate change values in the FEMA BCA modules and what supporting documentation should be provided. Participants will be encouraged to share their personal experiences, challenges and questions. A hands-on exercise will allow participants to review sample climate change project BCA data and work in small groups to assess the documentation used to support the data. The agenda indicates the following percentage breakdown of instructional methods for the workshop:

50% Lecture
25% Facilitated Discussion
17% Case Study Exercises
08% Question and Answer


AGENDA

10 min. Introduction (Lecture/Discussion)
30 min. Accounting for Sea Level Rise in the FEMA BCA Modules (Lecture/Discussion)  
20 min. Climate Resilient Mitigation Activities (Lecture/Discussion)
20 min. FEMA BCA Tools for Climate Resilient Mitigation Activities (Lecture/Discussion)
10 min. Analysis Dos and Don’ts (Lecture/Discussion)
20 min. Group Case Studies (Case Study Exercises)
10 min. WrapUp / Q&A


EXERCISES
Participants will be provided two draft case studies of climate resilient mitigation activities. The two case study assessments will last approximately 10 minutes each and will work in groups to assess the project and potential issues related to BCA.

Instructors:
John Squerciati, PE, CFM
Senior Associate, Dewberry
John Squerciati has over eighteen years of post-disaster damage assessment, hazard mitigation, and benefit-cost analysis experience as a FEMA Technical Assistance Contractor. He has worked on numerous natural disasters and terrorist events. John has assisted in developing and updating several FEMA policy and technical documents, including technical development of the FEMA Damage Frequency Assessment module and other re-engineered BCA tools, and prepared and led instruction of BCA training materials. He has been a project manager or senior subject matter expert for FEMA’s national BCA Helpline for over five years. John received his civil engineering undergraduate and graduate degrees from the Cooper Union.

Juan Nieves, EIT, CFM
Project Engineer, Dewberry
Juan Nieves has over nine years of post-disaster damage assessment, hazard mitigation, and benefit-cost analysis experience. Juan has worked on numerous natural disasters. He led teams in the field conducting Substantial Damage assessments and assisted in developing and updating several FEMA policy and technical documents, including development of an ASTM Standard for evaluation of flood damage-resistance in building materials. Juan has been an inquiry coordinator for FEMA’s national BCA Helpline since September 2014 and is currently the Dewberry project manager. Mr. Nieves received his undergraduate degree in civil engineering from the University of Puerto Rico.

Jody Springer
BCA Program Lead, Grants Data and Analytics Branch, FEMA Headquarters
Jody Springer is the BCA Program lead in the Grants Data and Analytics Branch at FEMA Headquarters in Washington, DC. He has over ten years of emergency management, hazard mitigation, and benefit-cost analysis experience. Mr. Springer led the re-engineering of FEMA BCA tools and training in 2007, performed thousands of BCAs for HMA program grants, and conducted over 50 BCA trainings nationwide. He has been the FEMA project monitor for FEMA’s national BCA Helpline for several years, and is currently the FEMA technical monitor for the helpline.

Rebecca Carroll, AICP
Project Monitor, Grants Data and Analytics Branch, FEMA Headquarters
Rebecca Carroll is a Project Monitor in the Grants Data and Analytics Branch at FEMA Headquarters in Washington, DC. She has been the FEMA technical monitor for FEMA’s national BCA Helpline over the past year, and is now the FEMA project monitor for the FEMA BCA Helpline. She previously worked for the Department of Defense for six years as a project manager. Ms. Carroll earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Saint Louis University and a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

* Risk MAP: Through the Eyes of the Community (1-3pm) - $

Intermediate = written for attendees with some experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017 from 1-3pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
This workshop will go through the entire Risk MAP process and show all the points along the process where communities are given opportunity to add input and potentially influence the final product. We will use real-life examples and case studies to demonstrate how information is distributed to communities, and ultimately community responses to these outreach occurrences. This training will equip all participants in the knowledge of how communities and individuals can understand the mapping timeline and utilize input points afforded by FEMA to receive best mapping product possible.

PREREQUISITES
Familiarity with the FEMA mapping products is recommended but not required.

TARGET AUDIENCE
This workshop is geared toward local floodplain managers, code officials, planners, emergency managers, state officials, engineers, surveyors, and others who may have opportunities to review and comment on FEMA mapping procedures as they affect communities.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Participants identify the community’s role in initiating hazard risk or mitigation projects, enhancing existing risk discussions.
  2. Participants know when the community or individuals within the community have the right to review and/or appeal products FEMA has produced.
  3. Participants will know what communication communities will receive from FEMA through entirety of the mapping process.
  4. Participants will discuss actions communities should take as a result of the new products.

TOPICS
  • FEMA Risk MAP Discovery Process
  • New BW 12 Outreach Requirements for Communities during Map Production
  • Preliminary Map Distributions
  • CCO Meetings and Outreach Post Distribution of Preliminaries 
  • Letters of Final Determination
  • FEMA Suspension Letters and Ordinance Updating
OUTLINE
50% lecture
25% Discussion
25% Exercise

AGENDA
05 min: Introductions
10 Min: Discovery Pre-meeting (Lecture)
10 Min: Discovery Meeting and Post Meeting Processes (Discussion)
25 Min: Community Activities during Mapping Process (Lecture)
25 Min: Preliminary Distribution, Comment Period, and CCO Meetings (Lecture)
25 Min: Appeal Period Processes (Discussion & Exercise)
10 Min: Letters of Final Determination through Effective Maps (Exercise)


EXERCISES

(Appeal Period Processes section) Students will be given examples of new maps produced by FEMA with explanations on what is changing on the maps. Students will work by themselves or in groups to discuss what data can be appealed based on FEMA standards.

(LFD through Effective Maps section) Students will be given two maps, one currently in effective for a community, and one that is scheduled to go effective. The students will work in groups to discuss current regulation levels for a community, and what the new maps show as needing to be adopted based on map changes. The end will result in discussion from the entire class on what needs to be done from the community perspective to adopt the new maps correctly and in a timely manner.


Instructors:
Brock Remus, CFM
Senior GIS Analyst, Atkins North America
Brock Remus has 8 years of NFIP experience working with homeowners, local, state and federal and government officials, and professional surveyors and engineers concerning regulations, MT-1 processing guidance and due process.  For 6 years, he served as the Region V MT-1 Lead for Atkins and STARR under Risk MAP. Mr. Remus currently serves as the Overall Due Process Manager, Region 9 Lead, and Project Manager on several studies for the STARR II contract under Risk MAP.  Mr. Remus has presented several national MT-1 training webinars that have been implemented as industry standards across the program.

Marshall Rivers, CFM
Project Manager, Atkins North America
Marshall Rivers, Marshall Rivers has seven years of NFIP experience working with local, state, and federal partners to generate risk awareness and promote risk reduction. Mr. Rivers has worked in all facets of the Risk MAP program serving as a chief point of contact for risk identification, analysis, assessment, and planning. In coordination with FEMA Region X, Mr. Rivers has reviewed or executed work on multi-hazard risk assessments in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington focusing on everything from avalanche to wind. A graduate of the University of Connecticut, Mr. Rivers has a B.A. in Geography and Political Science and an M.A. in Geography and GIS.  Marshall currently serves as a Risk MAP Project Manager for STARR II.

Brian Killen, CFM
Senior Program Analyst, Stantec
Brian brings 10 years of experience supporting mapping and engineering projects with a focus on FEMA flood studies. He is responsible for providing mapping support on numerous flood studies throughout the nation. He frequently fills the role of quality reviewer and mapping specialist, including serving as Geospatial Data Coordination (GDC) lead and Post-Preliminary Processing (PPP) lead for Stantec’s FEMA Flood Hazard Mapping program. He is proficient in a variety of GIS applications, FEMA guidance and standards, and the Mapping Information Platform (MIP), that are regularly used to aid in quality reviews and project management.

Flow Simulations Using 2D Unsteady Model in HEC-RAS 5.03 (1-5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017 from 1-5pm
Cost = $45, 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
This intensive workshop aims to prepare engineers, water resource professionals, and policy makers to use the newly added two-dimensional (2D) unsteady flow simulation tool in HEC-RAS 5.03 model. Participants are expected to get hands-on tutoring on how to use the 2D module in HEC-RAS 5.03, practice on how to add 2D flow to an existing 1D HEC-RAS model, and develop graphic displays or animation of the simulation results. The workshop is divided into two 75-mins sessions and one 60-mins section.

Section 1: Fundamentals of 2D model and computational grid: the governing equations and numerical methods in HEC-RAS 2D flow model, steps to develop the terrain model through RAS Mapper, generate 2D grid, assign properties to grid cells, and connect 1D and 2D grids.  

Section 2: Hydraulic structures in 1D and 2D flow model: design hydraulic structures including dam, levee, grade control, bridge, culvert, incorporate hydraulic structures into geometric files, define internal boundary conditions, parameters for dam breach, levee breach simulation.

Section 3: Simulation using 1D/2D Model: boundary conditions of 2D model, internal boundary conditions connecting 1D and 2D models, modeling parameters (e.g., time step, convergence criteria), unsteady flow model runs, stability, and debugging, interpretation of modeling results, data export, visualization, graphic displays, animations, and sensitivity of modeling results

Course Material: Participants are expected to receive a CD that contains the officially released HEC-RAS 5.03 software (http://www.hec.usace.army.mil/software/hec-ras/downloads.aspx ), HEC-RAS User’s Manual, HEC-RAS Hydraulic Reference Manual, HEC-RAS Example Problems, and Course Material and Additional Example Problems.

PRE-REQUISITES
Experience in using HEC-RAS steady flow analysis

WHAT TO BRING
Attendees should bring their own laptop computers with a USB port and ability to install and run software.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Water resource engineers for private and public sectors

OBJECTIVES
  1. Apply HEC-RAS 2D flow model to flood analysis
  2. Add 2D flow areas to the existing HEC-RAS 1D flow model
  3. Provide more accurate flood inundation map using 2D flow option
TOPICS
  • Flood flow analysis using HEC-RAS 2D flow model
OUTLINE
40% lecture, demonstration
40% hand-on user exercise/practice of examples, and repetition of instructors' steps
20% questions and answers, interactions between instructor and participators

AGENDA
1:00-2:15pm: Section 1: Fundamentals of 2D model and computational grid
2:30-3:45pm: Section 2: Hydraulic structures in 1D and 2D models
4:00-5:00pm: Section 3: Model run, and post-processing of modeling results

EXERCISES
Two HEC-RAS 2D flow example runs will be provided as the major exercises for the course.


Example #1: Bald Eagle Creek Multi2D model This case demonstrated the capabilities of 2D flow model in simulating unsteady flow in a river reach with a dam, levee, lateral structures, and complex terrain. Users have the flexibility to use 1D only, 1D/2D, and 2D only options to perform the simulation. Dam and levee breach analysis is also included in the example.

Example #2: Muncie Model This case simulates flow passing through a meandering bend. Levees are served as the lateral structures to connect 1D and 2D flow areas. Various land use types allow the users to select Manning's roughness parameters. The instructor will use this case to illustrate the difference between flow storage area and 2D flow area, and the basics of levee breach analysis in unsteady flow simulation.

Instructor:
Prof. Jennifer Duan, PE
Associate Professor, University of Arizona
Prof. Jennifer G. Duan is a registered PE in the state of Arizona. She is the Delbert Lewis Distinguished Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, the University of Arizona. She also won the prestigious National Science Foundation Career Award. Her research in hydraulics and sediment transport has resulted in over 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals and proceedings. She is currently serving as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Hydrology. She has taught many courses in hydraulics and sediment transport, including HEC-RAS2D training course, to engineers in Arizona.

Succeeding in the NFIP (1-5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
MONDAY, 5/1/2017 from 1-5pm
Cost = $45, 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
How do elevations and regulations interact in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)? Understanding that relationship guides our work, whether for insurance rating, design purposes, or applications to update flood mapping. This practical session examines the Elevation Certificate in light of the NFIP regulations related to the various purposes of that form and reviews some of the technical guidance available to better fulfill those purposes. We will also examine Letters of Map Amendment and Letters of Map Revision Based on Fill to assure applications will be successful.
 
PRE-REQUISITES
Some prior knowledge or experience using the Elevation Certificate may be helpful but not required. Knowledge of how to read a map is helpful but not required.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Surveyors, engineers, architects, code officials, realtors, insurance agents, new floodplain managers

OBJECTIVES

  1. Understand the direct relationship between elevations and regulations in the NFIP
  2. Achieve greater success with LOMA and LOMR-F applications
  3. Identify various sources of Base Flood Elevations, and recognize when technical approaches are necessary rather than simplified methods in determining BFEs
TOPICS
  • 44 CFR sections relating to land development and to map changes
  • Hazard, risk, and zone definitions
  • Effect on scope and flood study approach on mapping detail
  • Definitions of LOMCs, CLOMCs. The differences between LOMA an LOMR-F applications, why they differ, why it matters
  • Multiple uses of Elevation Certificates, and effect on completion; review of information reported in each section of the form
  • Relationships between building diagrams and technical guidance documents; distinctions between basements and crawl spaces (and why it matters); appropriate flood openings
  • Technical compliance versus exemption from NFIP insurance and construction requirements
  • Finding BFE data; when technical instead of simplified approaches must be used; using Flood Insurance Study report data
OUTLINE
Participants will be encouraged to ask questions and contribute from their own experiences throughout this interactive workshop.

60% Lecture with heavy class participation (Q&A throughout)
40% Facilitated discussion, overall group and individual exercises

AGENDA
15 min. General background of the NFIP (creation, objectives, regulations)
15 min. Identification of floodplains, hazard, risk, distinction between flood zones
60 min. Maps and how to change them (overview of the mapping process, LOMC, CLOMC; includes exercises to determine which LOMC application is appropriate, and likely outcome)
15 min. Introduction to the Elevation Certificate and its various purposes
30 min. Building diagrams, basements, crawlspaces, and flood openings (how NFIP regulations and technical guidance documents apply to the Elevation Certificate)
30 min. Review of each section of the Elevation Certificate
45 min. Sources/methods for obtaining Base Flood Elevation
15 min. Class exercise to determine Base Flood Elevations for 3 sites

EXERCISES
Exercise #1: Participants will be presented with two fact scenarios. For each one, group discussion will determine what kind of LOMC is appropriate, its likelihood of success, or if more information is needed.

Exercise #2: Participants will be shown a portion of a FIRM. Floodway data tables and profiles relating to this FIRM will also be available. Three sites on the map are marked, and based on the various materials provided, each individual will decide if there is enough information to determine BFE immediately or if another approach to finding BFE is necessary. This is followed by group discussion on what BFEs could be determined and approaches used.

Instructor:

Wendy Lathrop, PLS, CFM

President, Cadastral Consulting, LLC
Wendy Lathrop, PLS, CFM, president and owner of Cadastral Consulting, LLC has served on both the first and second Technical Mapping Advisory Councils to FEMA, and on a panel studying flood hazard mapping accuracy for the National Academies of Science, resulting in the 2009 report “Mapping the Zone: Improving Flood Map Accuracy.”  Wendy has taught seminars across the country since 1986 and has been a regular columnist in national magazines since 1983, currently as a contributing editor for The American Surveyor magazine. She is a contributing author to the American Bar Association's text, "Land Surveys: A Guide for Lawyers and Other Professionals", including an article entitled “National Flood Insurance Program: Floodplain Management and Regulatory Basics for Land Development.”

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Workshops - Tuesday, May 2

Get CRS Credit for Preserving Natural & Beneficial Functions! CRS Activity 420 (2:30pm - 5pm) - $

Intermediate = written for attendees with some experience in FPM or the topic area
TUESDAY, 5/2/2017 from 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs


DESCRIPTION
This workshop is focused on the benefits of natural areas and how preserving them can help communities lower their flood insurance premiums through the Community Rating System and increase their resilience. The ASFPM, the Coastal States Organization, The Nature Conservancy, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are working together to help communities identify, map, and preserve open space with three decision support tools: 1) TNC’s Community Rating System Explorer, 2) ASFPM and CSO’s Green Guide, and 3) NOAA’s Open Space Preservation How-to.

PREREQUISITES
Basic understanding of the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System and familiarity with GIS and web-based tools

WHAT TO BRING
This workshop requires registrants bring a laptop computer with ability to access the Internet. Mobile devices are not compatible with the requirements to participate in this workshop.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Planners, practitioners, local Community Rating System coordinators, and managers who are familiar with the Community Rating System program and are interested in earning credits within Activity 420

OBJECTIVES
  1. Understand the importance of open space and Activity 420 Open Space Preservation within the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System
  2. Use a variety of tools to locate and prioritize eligible open space preservation areas and calculate potential OSP credits
  3. Apply knowledge gained during the workshop to facilitate the CRS open space application process
TOPICS
  • Flood reduction benefits of natural infrastructure
  • Community Rating System Activity 420 Open Space Preservation
  • Tools and resources to help communities address CRS Activity 420 Open Space Preservation
OUTLINE
The workshop will be a mixture of presentation, question and answer, and an interactive exercise that allows participants to dive into the tools so they can apply the skills and knowledge gained in the workshop.  

First 2 hours: CRS Activity 420 Open Space Preservation and tools overview (50% lecture, 50% demonstration and Q&A discussion)


Second 2 hours: Benefits to your community: Exploring tools for a specific scenario (50% small group exercise, 50% discussion and sharing of lessons learned)

AGENDA
30 min. Overview of CRS and Activity 420 Open Space Preservation (Lecture)
30 min. Considerations for new and current participants (Lecture/Discussion)
60 min. Tools and Resources to Help (Demonstration/Q&A Discussion)
60 min. Open Space Preservation Activity (Small Group Exercise)
30 min. Report out (Discussion)
15 min. Summary and Recap

EXERCISES
Students will test drive the decision support tool and associated guides to increase their understanding and comfort level. They will also see how these resources are complementary yet relevant for different applications and at different scales. (20 min)

In small groups, participants will receive a hypothetical scenario where they must identify the total amount of open space in their area of interest, understand why it is open space and whether it qualifies for additional Natural Functions credit. Participants will determine what element(s) within Activity 420 these areas are eligible to receive credit for and why. With the information provided, they will decide which tools could provide assistance for their task at hand. (40 min)

Instructors:
Rebecca Love
Sr. Coastal Mgmt. Specialist, The Baldwin Group on contract to NOAA's Office for Coastal Management
Rebecca Love provides outreach and technical assistance for many of the tools and resources within the Digital Coast with the goal of helping coastal communities increase resilience by incorporating natural infrastructure into local planning activities. As part of NOAA’s Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) team, Rebecca reviews remotely sensed land cover imagery and change data. She has a bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from Clemson University and a master’s degree in Oceanography from the University of New Hampshire.

Lora Eddy
Coastal Engagement Coordinator, The Nature Conservancy

Lori Cary-Kothera
Science & Geospatial Solutions Operations Mgr., NOAA's Office for Coastal Management
In addition to leading the effort for the development of Digital Coast, Lori works on a variety of projects helping local coastal resource agencies better utilize technologies to address coastal issues. Recently Lori has been working with communities in the Great Lakes helping to address their flooding issues using green infrastructure techniques. Lori has a BS in Biology and Environmental Science from Bowling Green State University and a MS degree in Biological Oceanography from Florida Institute of Technology.

Jeff Stone, GISP, CFM
Senior Research Manager, ASFPM
Jeff manages research and outreach projects that focus on informing flood policy through science. Projects include, but are not limited to developing and evaluating tools, websites and software; researching the legal, practical and technological issues related to flood management policy and practices; and communicating effective use of GIS tools and applications aimed at floodplain management. He earned his B.S. and M.S. in Geographic Information Sciences with a strong emphasis on coastal and fluvial geomorphology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Presenter Training for the WARD’S Stormwater Floodplain 3D Model: A Hands-on Workshop for Education & Outreach (2:30pm - 5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
TUESDAY, 5/2/2017 from 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs


DESCRIPTION
This workshop will provide training on how to effectively us the WARD’S Stormwater Floodplain 3D Simulation Model for education and outreach in your community. The 3D model is not a computer model. It's a “get your hands wet interactive table top watershed in a box." All that is needed to run the 3D model is your imagination and a bucket of water. Attendees will learn how to engage audiences with interactive “hands-on” activities with the 3D model. These activities will illustrate the importance of floodplains and raise awareness of the benefits of properly managed floodplains while promoting the profession of floodplain management. The 3D model is easy to use, very “hands-on," and offers a real opportunity to educate children and adults about the dangers and impacts of unplanned development and human activity in the floodplain.

PREREQUISITES
Basic understanding of floodplain management is recommended but not required. A willingness to interact with others in a small group setting is required.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Workshop is geared toward anyone who has a passion for education and outreach pertaining to floodplain management

OBJECTIVES
  1. Effectively use the Stormwater Floodplain 3D model for education and outreach.
  2. Explore the value of floodplains in flood management.
  3. Demonstrate how changes in land use impact flooding.
  4. Demonstrate through the use of the 3D model ASFPM’s concept of “No Adverse Impact”.
  5. Help attendees gain a comfort level with the activities associated with the curriculum for the 3D model.
  6. Introduce and demonstrate the concept of “low impact development” and best Stormwater management practices and their role in floodplain management.
  7. Introduce and demonstrate the concept of “Runoff Footprint”.
  8. Introduce and demonstrate the concept of a watershed approach to floodplain management.
  9. Contrast and compare hydrographs created using the 3D model.
  10. Introduce the flood safety concept of “Turn Around Don’t Drown”.
TOPICS
  • Natural and Beneficial functions of floodplains
  • Quick overview of the curriculum of the Stormwater Floodplain 3D model
  • Case Study of a flooded community
  • The fate of rain and a brief discussion of the hydrologic cycle
  • Flood risk factors/Ice Jams
  • Man-made attempts to minimize flooding
  • Factors affecting flood forecasting
  • River Crest Analysis/Hydrograph Analysis
  • No Adverse Impact
  • Runoff Footprint
  • “Soft path” vs. “Hard path” to floodplain Management
  • NOAA/National Weather Service’s “Turn Around Don’t Drown” campaign
OUTLINE
10% Lecture
20% Facilitated Discussion
70% Small Group Exercises

AGENDA

10 min. Introductions
20 min. Facilitated Discussion
15 min. Exercise 1 – Hands On Group Exercise with 3D model
15 min. Exercise 2 - Hands On Group Exercise with 3D model
15 min. Exercise 3 - Hands On Group Exercise with 3D model
15 min. Exercise 4 - Hands On Group Exercise with 3D model m
10 min. Floodplain Education in our Local Schools Campaign
10 min. State Chapter discussion of best practices with 3D model
10 min. Wrap up/Question and Answer

EXERCISES
Students will use the stormwater floodplain simulation system in four 15 minute exercises that simulate the following:
  • Exercise 1 and 2 - Modeling Flood Risk Factors: What happens to a river and its associated flood- plains when wetlands are replaced with a mall? Model rainfall on wetlands, observe and collect data to determine the affects on the river's flow rate downstream. With this dynamic model, replace the Wetland Headwater with the Parking Lot/Plaza Headwater tray and determine the affects development has on the river and associated floodplains. The use of land may or may not affect the river flow by communities upstream, but the affect can be significant downstream. timeline = 30 minutes
  • Exercise 3 and 4 - Modeling Man-Made Attempts to Minimize Flooding: Can man control flooding? Explore man-made levees and retention ponds. Using the Parking Lot/Plaza Headwater tray, place clay levees in various areas to protect houses within the floodway and floodplain down river. Determine where the levees are most effective. Place the Retention Pond Headwater tray under the Parking Lot Headwater tray. Observe and record the impacts on the river and associated floodplains. timeline = 30 minutes
Instructors:
Mark Walton, CFM
Executive Director, Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association
Mark Walton currently serves as the Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association’s Executive Director, is a member of the Association of State Floodplain Managers, and a Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM). He is one of the principle scientists/developers of the Stormwater Floodplain Simulation System. He received his B.S. in Watershed Management at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1980, and his M.S. in Natural Resources/Remote Sensing at the University of Michigan in 1983.

Ethics for Floodplain Managers & Engineers (2:30pm - 5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
TUESDAY, 5/2/2017 from 2:30-5pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
Many professions have mandatory ethics training requirements for their licensed professionals. In an effort to offer ethics training for floodplain managers, ASFPM’s Professional Development Committee (PDC) has designed this workshop to promote ethical behaviors and enhance our profession. The workshop will review ethical issues often encountered in the floodplain management profession and will be applicable to engineers, floodplain managers, surveyors and others involved in the floodplain management profession. The course will explain and review the Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) Code of Ethics and the fundamental principles and canons of engineering ethics.

PRE-REQUISITES
Most attendees at this conference will understand the concepts of professional ethics and many will have seen good and bad examples of where ethics were (or were not) followed.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Local officials, engineers, floodplain managers, building code officials, planners, realtors, surveyors or anyone else that works with floodplain management rules and regulations.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Understand the importance of having a professional Code of Ethics as a floodplain manager
  2. Understand how ethics impact the day to day activities of floodplain managers and engineers
  3. Recognize situations that could cause ethical dilemmas to arise
  4. Consider ethical situations from multiple perspectives (i.e. engineer, developer, realtor, homeowner)
  5. Utilize best practices to avoid and navigate various ethical dilemmas as well as tips to maintain professional integrity
TOPICS
  • CFM professional code of ethics
  • Fundamental principles and canons of engineering ethics
  • Other professions with similar codes of ethics
  • Real life scenarios where ethics are questioned
OUTLINE
The workshop will be presented through a review of both CFM and engineering professional codes of ethics and how each of those ethics apply in day-to-day floodplain management activities. Attendees will then break into smaller groups where they will review and discuss examples of real life scenarios where unethical behavior has taken place. They will identify the ethical issues and perspectives of the various parties involved. Each smaller group will then report back to the full group with their findings.

50% lecture

30% small group exercise
20% facilitated group discussion

AGENDA
05 min. Welcome, Introductions, Overview
25 min. CFM Ethics
20 min. PE Ethics
35 min. Breakout Session - Ethical Scenarios
25 min. Report Out
10 min. Closing/Review


EXERCISES

Workshop attendees will work in small groups (5-7 people each) to review and discuss real life scenarios where unethical behavior has taken place. Each group will be given two scenarios, one related to floodplain management and one engineering focused. They will review each scenario and discuss the unethical behavior from the different (maybe competing) perspectives of the participants in their scenario. For example, one of the scenarios deals with a development in the floodplain and the different interests of the developer, engineer, local official and future homeowners. Each group will discuss how the ethical situation could have been avoided and actions that could be taken to resolve the problem going forward.


After roughly 30-40 mins (15-20 mins for each scenario), each group will present their findings to the large audience to compare/contrast how others viewed the same problem. The instructors will facilitate this part of the discussion and ask pointed questions about the scenarios to solicit large group discussion. Ideally, scenarios will be distributed among the tables to limit too much overlap. It would be helpful, but not mandatory, that each small group have some professional diversity to enable diversity in their discussions. The report outs will take approximately 25-30 minutes (in total) depending on the number of small groups. In previous sessions, the first few report outs take approximately 5-10 minutes each, then they start going faster to avoid duplicating the responses. After all tables have reported, the workshop instructors will summarize and wrap up the workshop.

Instructors:
Louie Greenwell, GISP, CFM
ASFPM Professional Development Cmte. Co-Chair, GIS Director - Water Resources, PRIME AE Group, Inc.
Louie currently serves as Director of GIS - Water Resources for PRIME AE Group. He has a diverse background in GIS implementation that has covered many levels of federal, state and local government. His experience includes GIS implementation planning, applications and database development, infrastructure and asset management, and floodplain management. He has a BS in Geography from the University of Louisville and is an active member of several professional organizations serving as former Treasurer of the Cumberland Chapter of URISA and current Co-Chair of the Professional Development Committee of ASFPM. Louie also serves on the Certification Board of Regents for ASFPM’s Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) program.

Jessica Baker, PE, PMP, CFM
ASFPM Professional Development Cmte. Co-Chair, Vice President, Halff Associates, Inc.
Jessica is a Vice President at Halff Associates in Richardson, TX and currently serves as the Regional Technical Coordinator (RTC) on the Compass PTS Team supporting FEMA Region 6. Jessica serves as the Texas Floodplain Management Association (TFMA) President. Jessica serves as the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) Region 6 Director, on the Board of Directors since 2012. She also serves as the Professional Development Committee (PDC) Co-Chair where she’s worked to introduce ethics training for floodplain managers throughout the nation. Jessica has a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. She is a licensed Professional Engineer, a Certified Floodplain Manager, and obtained the Project Management Professional certification.

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Workshops - Thursday, May 4

* Avoiding Litigation & Lessons Learned (2:30pm - 5pm) - $

Intermediate = written for attendees with some experience in FPM or the topic area
THURSDAY, 5/4/2017 from 2:30-5pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
This workshop is a combination of “avoiding litigation” and “lessons learned” in drainage, flooding, and floodplain management lawsuits. Litigation can result from poor design decisions, unclear reports or studies, company or agency policies, misunderstood standards or regulations, availability of accurate mapping data, NFIP compliance, and related factors. Several case studies of lawsuits with specific technical-legal issues will be presented, ranging from small floodplain study conflicts to large basin hydrologic modeling differences of opinion. Two hands-on workshop problems, from actual cases, will offer an opportunity for students to express their opinions on the merits of the plaintiff and defendant positions.

PRE-REQUISITES
Experience or current position that involves floodplain management, drainage design, flood control or regulatory decisions

TARGET AUDIENCE
Local, state, federal or private engineers or floodplain managers

OBJECTIVES
  1. Be aware of litigation issues that can arise from actions in floodplains or drainage design.
  2. Understand the circumstances that might face them if called as expert witnesses.
  3. Participate in their future floodplain and drainage work with an awareness of possible litigation that could arise from their actions or impacts from others.
TOPICS
  • Definitions and descriptions of litigation terminology
  • Practical suggestions for roles as expert witnesses
  • Professional and ethical responsibilities in lawsuits
  • Case studies of lawsuits related to flooding, drainage, and floodplain management. Includes two hands-on workshop problems for students
  • Lessons learned, how to avoid or reduce the threat of litigation
OUTLINE
Workshop will presented with a background of litigation terminology and an overview of roles and responsibilities for those involved in lawsuits. A series of case studies with specific technical, legal, regulatory, and ethical issues, including two workshop problems that will follow. Conclusions will include lessons learned and class discussion of avoiding litigation in their work.

60% Lecture
30% Hands-on Class Problems
10% Facilitated Discussion of Workshop Conclusions – Avoiding Litigation

AGENDA
15 min. Definitions, suggestions, roles and responsibilities in litigation
50 min. Case studies
40 min. Hands-on workshop problems for students.
15 min. Conclusion: Lessons learned, avoiding or reducing the threat of litigation.

EXERCISES
For the two workshop problems students will work in pairs. The students will have 20 minutes to work on the two hand-out problems and answer the questions related to: Find any Technical/Regulatory/Legal/Ethical issues for case; Ways the lawsuit could have been avoided; Responsibilities of local government agencies; and Who should have prevailed in the case? A 20 minute class discussion of student’s answers will conclude the exercise.


Instructor:
T. Lynn Lovell, PE, D.WRE, CFM
Vice President, Halff Associates, Inc.
T. Lynn Lovell, P.E., D.WRE, CFM has over 45 years of experience in water resources planning and management. Mr. Lovell earned BSCE (1968) and MSCE/Water Resources (1969), from Texas Tech University. He spent 13 years with the Fort Worth District, Corps of Engineers in water resources planning, hydraulic design, flood control planning, including six years as Chief of the Floodplain Management Services Branch.   Since January 1981, at Halff Associates, his duties include water resources planning, master drainage plans, FEMA studies, hydraulic design, floodplain management, flood control, and stormwater.   He has prepared or supervised over 200 USACE, FEMA, city and state flood control or floodplain studies and has served as an expert witness in over 40 drainage-related cases. He was the principal-in-charge of Halff’s FEMA Map Mod project, which included floodplain mapping of 52 TX Counties. He has been involved with ASFPM since the 4th Annual Conference in New Orleans and has presented 20 papers at ASFPM conferences. He has served on the Board of Directors for the Texas Floodplain Managers Association.

Balancing Flood Protection and Floodplain Restoration (2:30pm - 5pm) - $

Intermediate = written for attendees with some experience in FPM or the topic area
THURSDAY, 5/4/2017 from 2:30-5pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
Increasing pressure on riparian and historical floodplain habitat in developing urban areas has led local flood protection agencies to seek restoration opportunities in conjunction with flood risk reduction projects. A setback levee can be the answer, but comes with significant challenges. How to maintain the flood protection line of defense during a multi-year installation? How to utilize levee zoning and nearby material to build the project? This workshop delves into a case study. Come join us.

PRE-REQUISITES
Some experience with project earthwork mass balances is required, as is some exposure to geotechnical stability and seepage models. Basic knowledge of construction scheduling is also needed.

WHAT TO BRING
A laptop with a spreadsheet application would be useful. Everyone should have an engineering pad and calculator.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Engineers that manage projects

OBJECTIVES
  1. Identify risks associated with multi-year construction phasing of a flood risk reduction project
  2. Identify factors that make a levee zoning configuration stable
  3. Evaluate to what degree a borrow inventory satisfies a levee zoning configuration
TOPICS
  • Project setting and design objectives
  • Floodplain inundation frequency and targeted habitat restoration
  • Testing levee zoning options
  • Earthwork mass balance - optimizing available material
  • Multi-year construction phasing and maintaining a line of defense
OUTLINE
30% Lecture
20% Facilitated Discussion
50% Small Group Exercise

AGENDA
10 min Introductions
10 min Project Setting and Design Objectives (Lecture)
20 min Available Borrow and Levee Zoning Options (Lecture/Discussion)
20 min Project-Specific Earthwork Mass Balance (Lecture/Discussion)
40 min Developing a Multi-Year Phased Construction Schedule (Group Exercise)
20 min Group Report Out (Group Presentation)

EXERCISES
Once project background information and the basics of earthwork mass balances, levee zoning, and construction phasing have been reviewed, participants will work in groups to develop a multi-year construction phasing schedule that optimizes use of nearby available materials, meets monthly maximum material placement rates, and re-establishes the continuity of the flood protection system before each annual flood season.


Instructor:
Michael Vecchio, PE
Sr. Project Manager & Technical Specialist, HDR
Michael J. Vecchio is focused primarily in the area of civil planning and design of flood risk reduction projects. A diverse academic and professional background have allowed him to develop a strong skill set in the area of interdisciplinary project management. His academic background includes a B.A. in English, B.S in Geological Sciences and an M.S. in Civil Engineering with a concentration in Environmental Engineering. His project experience includes contaminate fate and transport numerical modeling, civil design in conjunction with industrial site remediation, civil design of ecosystem restoration features, civil design of levee improvement systems, and civil planning and design of coastal flood risk reduction and stabilization features. He managed an interdisciplinary design team that won the ASCE Region 9 2011 Large Flood Control Project of the year for California. The project he will focus on in this workshop is currently going to bid in California and includes a 3.5 mile setback levee in an urban setting.

Prop Up Training with Props (2:30pm - 5pm) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
THURSDAY, 5/4/2017 from 2:30-5pm
Cost = $45, 2 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
Different people have different preferences on how they like to learn. Some are visual, some like hands on, and others may be fine with straight lecture. To effectively reach different types of learners try incorporating some simple props into a training class. Some of the props you'll see in this workshop are straight from the dollar store and some are craft projects. In this class you'll see a variety of props that are used in training classes in the state of Kansas while holding a mock training. Once everyone has had a chance to see the props we will go over the benefits and explain how to make or acquire props to use in your own classes. Training is more effective when it reaches all of the students in the class.

PRE-REQUISITES
None

TARGET AUDIENCE
Floodplain management trainers, presenters, and those interested in developing their skills as trainers.

OBJECTIVES
  1. Make their own props
  2. Know how to acquire props
  3. How to offer more effective training
  4. How to deal with “hostage” students
TOPICS
How to use props to:
  • Teach/learn acronyms
  • Demonstrate 1% annual chance risk
  • Get cell phones shut off during class
  • Demonstrate floodproofed materials
  • Show how flood openings work
  • Explain how to build a disaster supply kit made with freebies
  • Explain how to filling out the elevation certificate
  • Teach about mold
  • Peform outreach on flood safety
OUTLINE
70% lecture
15% hands-on using props
15% for questions

AGENDA
The workshop will start with a welcome and then outline the goals for the clas, followed by a role-play demonstration of the props so attendees can see how these items are used in the classroom. Following the demo, the workshop will explain how each prop was made. Props will be handed out to attendees to try for themselves.

05 min. for introductions with cell phone etiquette
05 min. on hostage students and new people
05 min. on arm twisting
15 min. on FEMA alphabet soup
15 min. on magic trick bag
05 min. on flood proof materials
05 min. on flood openings
05 min. on engineered openings
05 min. on floodproof materials
15 min. on elevation certificate demonstration
05 min. on moisture meters
05 min. on mold
20 min. on making props
10 min. conclusion and wrap up

EXERCISES
The hands on exercise will involve some of the props. Props will be demonstrated and then attendee will have the opportunity to practice and play with the props through hands-on activities.


Instructor:
Steve Samuelson, CFM
NFIP Specialist, KS Dept. of Agriculture
Steve Samuelson graduated from Emporia State University with a BS degree with an emphasis in criminal psychology. Steve was Zoning Administrator and Floodplain Manager for Lyon County, KS prior to joining the Kansas Department of Agriculture in the Division of Water Resources as the NFIP Specialist in 2007. Steve uses his experiences working in a local community when providing technical support and training to local community officials across Kansas.

 

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Workshops - Friday May 5

* Effective Hazard Mitigation Planning: A Practical Approach (8am - Noon) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
FRIDAY, 5/5/2017 from 8am-12pm
Cost = $45, 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
Hazard mitigation planning is a cornerstone for building community and state resiliency to floods and other hazards. This workshop will introduce participants to a practical and clear approach to undertaking the development or update of a local hazard mitigation plan. The workshop will include guidance on implementing and leveraging the plan to the benefit of your community.

PRE-REQUISITES
None; for those with prior hazard mitigation planning experience this will provide a refresher and new tips and tools.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Local and State floodplain managers, emergency managers, mitigation and community planners

OBJECTIVES
Participants will gain an understanding of how to plan out and implement a successful planning process using the latest tools and resources.

TOPICS
  • Overview of the Disaster Mitigation Act and FEMA’s latest guidance and nine-step process
  • Getting organized: Identifying planning team and stakeholder membership
  • Integrating the Community Rating System CRS 10 step floodplain management process
  • Multi-jurisdictional planning considerations
  • Building resiliency through incorporation and integration with other planning efforts
  • Optimal meeting planning
  • Public engagement options and tips for success
  • Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment methods and tools
  • Incorporating related RiskMAP products and processes
  • Incorporating climate change considerations
  • Creating an actionable and implementation plan
  • Identifying flood and other hazard mitigation alternatives and opportunities
  • Prioritizing mitigation action items
  • Updating your local hazard mitigation plan
  • Implementing your plan and leveraging and managing pre and post-disaster funding opportunities
OUTLINE
35% lecture
40% small group exercise
25% facilitated discussion

AGENDA
The workshop will include presentations on three main topic areas, each approximately 25 minutes long. Group activities between presentations will allow participants to apply knowledge gained and interact with others. The workshop will conclude with planning tools and resources they can take home and implement.

10 min. Introductions
30 min. Overview and Planning Process presentation
25 min. breakout group work session
15 min. Group reporting and discussion
30 min. Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment presentation
20 min. breakout group work session
15 min. Group reporting and discussion
25 min. Mitigation Action Implementation Presentation, tools and wrap up discussion
25 min. breakout group work session
15 min. Group reporting and discussion

EXERCISES
Each module will be followed with a group activity with tables of 5-6 participants. As an example the first breakout activity will be a small group activity focused on identifiying planning committee participants and involving the public. Each group would discuss who the key members of their hazard mitigation planning committee would be, based on the guidance given at the workshop. Secondly they would be asked to identify a plan for involving the public. Each group would have twenty five minutes to discuss these topics, followed by a group reporting session approximately 15 minutes long for all groups combined. Similar group activities with similar time frames will be designed for the Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment and Mitigation Action Implementation modules.


Instructors:
Laurie Bestgen, CFM
Senior Hazard Mitigation Planner, Amec Foster Wheeler
Laurie Bestgen is a hazard mitigation and emergency management consultant with Amec Foster Wheeler’s Topeka, Kansas office and has over 20 years of related experience working with state and local governments. Laurie’s background includes 14 years of public sector experience including employment with the Kansas Division of Emergency Management and FEMA. Ms. Bestgen has contributed to the development of more than 25 FEMA-approved Disaster Mitigation Act compliant Hazard Mitigation Plans, including one Standard/Enhanced state plan and three standard state plans. Laurie has a B.A. in Biology from the University of Missouri in Kansas City.

Jeffrey Brislawn, CFM
Hazard Mitigation Lead/Sr. Associate, Amec Foster Wheeler
Jeff Brislawn is a hazard mitigation and emergency management consultant with Amec Foster Wheeler’s Boulder, Colorado office and has over 25 years of related experience for state and local governments. Jeff’s background includes 12 years of public sector experience including work for the Colorado Office of Emergency Management and FEMA. Mr. Brislawn has been the project manager on more than 20 local and state hazard mitigation planning projects and been a contributor to numerous others. Jeff has an M.S. in Geology from Colorado State University and a B.S. in Geology from Ohio University.

Using CHARM to Engage the Public in Community Flood Planning & Management (8am - Noon) - $

Introductory = written for attendees with no previous (or limited) experience in FPM or the topic area
FRIDAY, 5/5/2017 from 8am-12pm
Cost = $45, 3.5 CECs for CFMs

DESCRIPTION
The Community, Health, and Resources Management (CHARM) is an interactive, GIS-based workshop tool for the public and stakeholders. Using a low-cost, interactive table-top map interface, people can now collaborate to create hypothetical development scenarios for their communities. With access to over a dozen development paints and maps, participants can custom create planning scenarios and view real-time feedback. Where should growth be encouraged and where should it be avoided? How many homes are we putting in harm’s way? What do we want to conserve for future generations? CHARM helps communities see how planning decisions made today will impact tomorrow’s community.

PRE-REQUISITES
None

TARGET AUDIENCE
Local floodplain, stormwater, coastal managers and planners, local officials/agency leaders

OBJECTIVES
  1. Understand how CHARM can be used in their community flood management plan
  2. Understand the range of data and information that can be utilized in supporting community flood planning and management
  3. Have strategies for including citizens in their community in the planning process
  4. Provide input on the planning needs of floodplain and stormwater managers
TOPICS
  • Basics of land use planning for floodplain and stormwater management
  • Participatory GIS and stakeholder engagement
  • Scenario planning exercises
OUTLINE
The workshop will be a mix of lecture, facilitated discussion and hands-on group exercises designed to help the participants evaluate and balance community growth, land use planning, flood risk and floodplain management. Participants will be encouraged to share their community’s planning process and think about how their plans overlap with those of other communities.

70% Hands-on Group Exercise
15% Lecture
15% Facilitated Discussion

AGENDA
Hour 1: Introductions, Objectives and Overview, Hands-on CHARM orientation
Hour 2: Hands-on Scenario Planning
Hour 3: Hands-on Scenario Planning (cont’d), Hands-on Table Debrief
Hour 4: Hands-on Room Debrief, Q&A and Survey, Wrap Up

EXERCISES
Workshop participants will collaborate in groups of 6-8 people, over a live table-top map interface and explore a library of mapping data to plan hypothetical growth scenarios for their community. Each group is given the same scenario in which they need to double the population of their community within a 20-year time frame. The group must build at least 3 hypothetical developments (e.g. Town Center Mixed Use, Low-Rise Residential, Conservation Area, etc.). Real time feedback allows participants to see the consequences of their planning decisions. The planning support tool encourages collaborative problem solving, and no GIS experience is needed for stakeholders to participate in a CHARM workshop.


The groups have 3 major section during the hands-on exercise: 1) Explore Data & Maps - which involves understanding all the data available for flood planning and management; 2) Build Development Scenarios - participants build/redevelop their community with goal of doubling population in 20 years; and 3) Debrief & Share Your Table’s Scenario - participants share their planning strategies and the consequences of their choices.

Instructors:
Jeff Stone, GISP, CFM
Sr. Research Manager, ASFPM
Jeff manages research and outreach projects that focus on informing flood policy through science. Projects include, but are not limited to developing and evaluating tools, websites and software; researching the legal, practical and technological issues related to flood management policy and practices; and communicating effective use of GIS tools and applications aimed at floodplain management. He earned his B.S. and M.S. in Geographic Information Sciences with a strong emphasis on coastal and fluvial geomorphology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Steven Mikulencak, AICP
Planning Programs Leader, Texas A&M University AgriLife
Steven Mikulencak specializes in stakeholder participation and planning tools for local decision-makers. He has worked in the private sector on comprehensive plans, zoning, design guidelines, and GIS analyses for local governments. He now develops planning and outreach programs for TX communities. Projects include Coastal CHARM, The Texas Citizen Planner Program, CERC CTP Resiliency Workshops, the Highland Bayou Watershed Protection Plan in Galveston County, and is the lead facilitator for the TX RESTORE Roundtables. Projects are supported through partnerships with the National Sea Grant Office, FEMA Region VI, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the US EPA Gulf of Mexico Program, and the Galveston Bay Estuary Program. He earned his BS in Geology from Virginia Tech and his Masters in Urban Planning from Cornell University.

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